Rent A Dumpster Near Me

You or your company has a big project coming up. Maybe it’s a remodel or a demolition. Maybe it’s a building project.

You need a dumpster. Where to look?

Of course you can start with searching the big names in dumpster rentals.

1-800-Got-Junk?

1-800-Got-Junk is a national leader in dumpster and bag rental. They are able to be everywhere because they are a company that sells their brand as a franchise. Local owner-operators pay to use their branding and get their references, then do the work under their “Got Junk?” branding.

The Got Junk? brand received a lot of national attention for their involvement with the popular series Hoarders. In that series, psychologists and waste removal companies teamed up with family members to  address serious hoarding in the home of a loved one. the show Android a popular run, earning the got Junk brand a lot of publicity. while the company can supply labor, it cannot apply the kind of mental help that is necessary to get someone over clinical hoarding.

Hopefully that’s not what you need for your project!

You can click here to go to their website.

Waste Management

One of the nation’s largest dumpster and waste removal companies, their familiar green and yellow W & M logo can be seen almost everywhere in the United States. If you have ever seen a large green dumpster outside of a construction site, it was likely theirs.

Their national model seems attractive, but the moving company Move.org recently rated them 4 stars (out of 5) because of their “middle-of-the-road customer reviews.”

As is common with many dumpster rental companies, they are focused on providing you the last part of the puzzle – junk removal. You will need to apply the elbow grease to get the work done and get the debris out to the dumpster yourself.

Click here to go the Waste Management website.

Big Daddy Dumpster

In some parts of the country, users can take advantage of Big Daddy Dumpsters. Specializing in three sizes of Residential and Commercial dumpsters oh, Big Daddy Dumpster saves you money by limiting the options, bells, and whistles from which you have to choose.

By offering one price, based on the size of the dumpster, you get a straightforward picture of the cost of your project.

They won’t provide extra hands for the work, or dedicated recycling bins. What they will offer is a single, understandable price, clearly broken down in their conversation with you.

Click here to visit the Big Daddy Dumpster website.

Of course, you can always simply search on Google for the dumpster rental nearest you, and take your chances with what you find nearby.

Google search “dumpster rental near me”.

However, many people like the peace of mind that comes from using a trusted brand with years of experience and a commitment to staying in business for the long haul – even if it’s just the haul from your project to the landfill.

 

 

Common Costs Added to A Dumpster Rental

When you buy any product or service it is not unusual to have additional costs added at the end.

However, most people don’t usually rent a dumpster. so those extra costs might surprise you if you aren’t prepared.

In the best-case scenario the company you rent from offers a single price that includes everything.

However that company takes on multiple costs in the process Falling Away what remains of your project.

Here are some common costs you might see added to your dumpster rental.

Common Dumpster Rental Costs

Taxes

Taxes are the most predictable cost with any purchase. and your locality these may include a sales tax and perhaps a service or Usage Tax. Even for companies that claim to provide one low price, the tax will be added as a separate final cost. They want to remind you that Uncle Sam, and not the company, is getting that money.

Distance Fees

Depending on the location of your project and the distance between your dumpster rental company and that project, you may be charged a distance fee. You should be informed of this upfront and it should not be a surprise that shows up on your bill later. The company must haul the dumpster to and from your location, and to the dump or landfill, so there are multiple considerations in assessing these fees.

Hazardous Materials Fees

A common pass-along fee that dumpster companies charge depends entirely on the type of materials you are placing in your dumpster. Every municipality has its own rules and costs for disposing of certain types of materials. For instance, some materials might have to go to a separate location that is further away, or that might require additional sorting. These items include concrete.

Insurance Coverage or Damage Protection

Another common expense that sometimes is billed separately is insurance coverage or damage protection. The insurance protects you in the case of something going wrong with the dumpster. This should generally be included in the price, but some companies will offer that to you as an additional cost. This may be required to be an additional cost, so the insurer knows that you have been informed and can collect the money directly.

The damage protection shields the dumpster company from liability in case there are deep scrapes or gouges when the dumpster is delivered or removed, or if other damage happens on the property that needs to be repaired.

Excess Weight

Even if everything goes as planned, a “one-price” company might surprise you with a final upcharge for excessive weight.  although your company May advertise their dumpsters on the basis of size, they typically are build at the junkyard based on weight. If you exceed the anticipated weight many companies will pass that charge on to you. You can ask as you rent if that could happen to you.

Typically companies take all of these things  into consideration when they are renting a dumpster to you. Being prepared and asking these questions upfront helps make sure there are no surprise additional costs to your project.

Avoid Hidden Fees on Your Dumpster Rental

When you have a big project coming up at your home or office, either construction or destruction, a dumpster rental makes sense. You can save time, energy, and money by using one dedicated dumpster instead of hauling endless truckloads of waste to a local landfill or garbage dump.

It clearly beats the alternative of buying, filling, and then walking to the curb dozens of trash bags. The sight of of these bags piled high for days is far worse than the appearance of a dumpster.

A dumpster rental says to the community: we are doing some important work here, and it will be over soon.

A pile of trash bags says, “something went terribly wrong.”

One problem with dumpster rentals, though, is the hidden fees that some companies can add to the bill. You thought you signed up for one low price, but then you got stuck with a handful of extra charges that run your project over budget and beyond the expected price.

Here are some things to ask about before you sign your dumpster contract.

Ask about these often hidden dumpster fees

So to be certain you are not getting charged, here is a list of common (and not-so-common) fees that some companies or fly-by-night workers might charge you.

Drop-off fee – believe it or not, when you contract a dumpster, some companies don’t think that means they should drop it off for free. Some companies charge a drop-off fee, indicating that they must pay someone else to put the dumpster in place. This doesn’t make sense because getting a dumpster to your site seems the most obvious part of renting one. It doesn’t do you any good if it’s anywhere else!

Pick-up fee – sure enough, some companies don’t think that picking up your dumpster should be included in the overall charge. Ask about this in advance so you don’t get stuck with a useless pick-up fee.

Environmental surcharge – the costs of fuel for picking up and dropping off your dumpster should be included in the charge (though some companies have a reasonable radius around where they store their dumpsters) because they are not unanticipated expenses. Some companies call these fuel charges “environmental” costs, and pass them on to you.

Seasonal fees – this is another cost that should not be hidden in the fine print or only show up in the final bill. Everyone knows what season your project is happening in. And, except for possible local statutes, there shouldn’t be an extra charge to rent a dumpster in one of them.

Taxes – The sales and usage taxes in a given area don’t change much from day to day. They are not a surprise, and they are charged to almost every entity. If you are a for-profit business, expect taxes. If you are a non-profit, check local regulations to see if these taxes apply to you. But they should not be a surprise at the end, and should instead simply be a percentage of the cost of the dumpster. However, this is almost always added as a separate line on a dumpster bill and NOT included in their quoted price.

By asking a few questions up front, you can determine if your dumpster price is fair and free from hidden costs.

Your Big Daddy Dumpster Rental Experience

When it comes time to move a parent into an assisted living facility, someone must be deputized to handle the house and belongings. Often it is the person who lives the closest. Unfortunately, this person has become the de facto caretaker already, and the pain of loss and transition can make the moving experience emotionally challenging.

 

It is frustrating how little stuff a person gets to move with them into assisted living.

 

Even a cherished bed is going to be left behind for a safer, lower bed in the residences. Often people can keep their familiar dresser or a few small individual furniture pieces.

 

The scale of the work to clean the house out can become overwhelming.

 

There is furniture, clothing, old memories. Some of it you will keep and sort through, of course, but a lot of it needs to be thrown out.

 

The realtor won’t be any help. She will provide a tight timeline, and probably telling you that the only thing that sells slower than an empty house is one with outdated furniture and that “lived in” feel.

 

You might even need to take out carpets too. This could prove to be a huge job.

 

 

The right sized dumpster for the job

 

First, analyze which things might be useful at a thrift store, and how you could get it there. Your local St. Vincent DePaul will likely be helpful, agreeing to come pick up some items for a minimal fee. They might even sent over a couple of workers big enough to do most of the work themselves.

 

But you might still be left with a lot of stuff.

 

This is where renting a dumpster from Big Daddy Dumpsters come in handy.

 

You may have never rented one yourself, but the concept makes sense.

 

Go to their site to get some guidance on what size dumpster you needed.

 

For residential purposes they offer a 10 yard and 15 yard option. The 15 yarder might be large, but you don’t want to run the risk that the slightly smaller (10 yard) version won’t hold it all.

 

You will be amazed at how simple it is. The employee who answers the phone will be very accommodating, and help you work out a time to drop off and pick up the dumpster.

 

Now you have a timeline for your work that makes the realtor, your parent, and your siblings happy.

 

 

A Family Reunion of Sorts

Transitioning a loved one into a smaller, more supportive place is a hard time emotionally. But the whole process doesn’t have to be hard.

 

Spend a day with family sharing memories, tearing up carpets, and putting old furniture and useless items in a dumpster. It’s therapeutic.

 

Big Daddy Dumpsters can make their part easy. One phone call to set it up, and you can concentrate on everything else.

 

Why Rent a Dumpster?

You have seen the ads. A company promises to bring a huge dumpster and place it in front of your property for some amount of time. The plan is that you will easily haul away trash from a major project.

 

“Why would I do that?” you asked yourself. “That’s got to hurt my curb value.”

 

Perhaps you’ve wondered if making phone calls and paying for the delivery is worth it at all.

 

But let’s look at the alternatives.

 

Are There Alternatives to a Dumpster?

 

You could get a dumpster, but why? You could just purchase several boxes of large garbage bags.

 

Let’s walk through this process.

 

You fill one bag, then another. You still have to move it someplace. If you’re doing it the day before trash day, great! You can just haul it to the curb. However, many municipalities Have limits on how much trash they will pick up at an individual household.

 

Now you have become a small business manager, determining how much trash to put out … and where to store the rest of it for the next week.

 

Most of us store our trash in the back or side of the house.  So now you are in the business of moving your trash twice.

 

Ordering a dumpster puts YOU in charge of the schedule.

 

Garbage Bags are Not the Answer

 

Besides for many types of garbage, bags aren’t the answer. Table parts, furniture legs, lumber, and more all require separate handling.

 

The easiest way to handle this is the heart directly outside as you’re taking it apart and heave it in the dumpster.  You don’t have to disassemble anything. Just throw and go.

 

This can save countless hours fussing and struggling to break down pre-built furniture.

 

Additionally, with heavy items like old paint or wet and moldy drywall, you will use up dozens of bags and getting it all out to the curb. With a dumpster you can fill and dump buckets or other more solid containers. This makes it less likely that you will rip a bag and have to re-bag it, or that you will get a cut from sharp edges or screws and nails.

 

 

So renting a large dumpster from Big Daddy Dumpsters can save you time, energy, and money, and maybe keep you safer from cuts and scrapes.

 

The only real question is, why haven’t you called to schedule yours yet? Our friendly operators are standing by to take your call and schedule your dumpster today.

Junk Removal

Suddenly find yourself in possession of a lot of junk? Doing a major remodel or rebuild and about to create a pile of junk?

 

You need the Cincinnati, Dayton, and southwest Ohio junk removal experts: Big Daddy Dumpters.

 

When a little dumpster simply isn’t enough, and you need enough space to fit an entire room, Big Daddy Dumpsters is the answer.

 

With three options, ranging from big to humongous, Big Daddy Dumpsters has your dumpster solutions for all of your projects.

 

 

Home projects

 

Are you deciding whether it is time to throw out a mattress? Read about that here.

 

Is your mattress removal part of a bedroom remodel? Learn how to dispose of that here.

 

What about a major dining room remodel? We describe the choices you might need to make here.

 

In fact, at the Big Daddy Dumpsters blog, we have the answers to solve a lot of common questions that arise during common home remodeling scenarios.

 

 

Larger projects

 

Maybe it’s not an individual room, but a whole house or neighborhood you’re working on. Maybe you’re planning for a garage sale for yourself or for your neighborhood?

 

When you’re doing that, you’re going to want to know which stuff can be donated, and which stuff you need to throw away. It can’t all go to the curb.

 

This is when a small, medium, or large dumpster can come in handy, depending on the size of your project, or your neighborhood garage sale.

 

 

Worried about Green Recycling?

 

Are you thinking about the environment these days? Many of us are.

 

We are smarter than ever about how to dispose of potentially hazardous materials, and we have more resources available for safe disposal than any other generation.

 

Our blog can offer you information about a range of potentially hazardous materials. Follow these links to articles about the identified topics to be sure that you don’t throw away something that could potentially harm workers or get into the groundwater near your home.

 

 

These and many other common topics are available at our website, where our searchable blog can help you find the answers you are looking for.

 

And always, when it comes time to throw something away, Big Daddy Dumpsters can offer you speedy service and delivery.

 

Have a dumpster ready when you need it for your project.

When Is It Time to Replace My Mattress?

Americans have a love / hate relationship with our mattresses. We spend almost ⅓ of our time with them, and if it goes well, we have no memory of the experience.

 

Mattresses can be expensive investments, or cheap afterthoughts.

 

With this much time and money invested in finding the right mattress, when it starts to go, you want to carefully evaluate your options.

 

Here are signs that you need to throw your mattress away.

 

  1. It sags. There’s that sweet spot where you and your loved one cuddle, or you burrow in each night. You can find it easily because you sort of “roll in.” That sag, however, indicates that your support and ability to move around at night are diminished. Toss it.

 

  1. It has lumps and bumps. Lumps and bumps and buttons are signs of broken springs or misplaced foam and support. In addition to being a sign of wear and tear, they work against your good night’s sleep. Toss it.

 

  1. It is creaky, or squeaky. First, check if the creak or squeak is coming from your mattress or your box springs. Often the springs will be the culprit, and they should be replaced. If it is the mattress making the noise, but it’s not keeping you up, you can keep it a little while longer. But soon it will be time to toss it.

 

  1. Stains with odors. Pets, children, and a wide range of non-sleeping activities can leave your mattress stained. You can change the sheets and cover that up – you’re probably not hosting dinner parties on the bed anyway … right? But odors? If a quick spray with an over-the-counter cleaner doesn’t do the trick, toss the mattress.

 

  1. Bugs, especially bed bugs. No discussion here. Toss it. But what about …? No. Toss it.

 

  1. Aches and pains from sleeping. Your mattress and a night’s sleep should leave you feeling fit and rested, not tired and tested. If your mattress is the cause of your aches and pains, there is nothing to be done. Toss it.

 

Often your mattress and your box springs are a matched set. They don’t have to be, but a good match is an important thing to consider.

 

If you’ve got two large items to throw away, maybe it is time to consider renting a dumpster and turning this into a project?

How Do I Throw Out a Mercury Thermometer?

You know that you are supposed to be careful when disposing of mercury. But why? And what if it comes in such a tiny amount as what is in a thermometer?

Mercury is a toxic element that has confounded and enticed people since its discovery. The element 80, with the abbreviation Hg, has long been associated with speed. This is because, at room temperatures, it holds together well and glides almost without friction over a surface.

This speed, combined with its color, earned it the nickname “quicksilver.”

Because even water would not stick to it, a popular use for mercury in the past was to treat felt hats. Hatters would rub the element onto the felt surface, making the hat virtually waterproof.

Over time, though, the effect of daily interaction was very pronounced on hatters. They tended to suffer from mental illness or “lunacy” at a high rate, which was the basis for the term “mad as a hatter.” Mercury was the culprit.

Mercury in thermometers

Mercury was also very responsive to changes in temperature. If it got hotter, it would expand. Cooler, it would contract. It became the most common ingredient in home thermometers, as a reliable and sensitive gage of temperature.

However, as the EPA and global environmental groups came to realize, mercury was causing a host of other illnesses in people.

Worse yet, when dumped in the environment, mercury did not break down.

Instead, it steadily made its way to water, remaining in its original form. There it sat until ingested by fish, or the things that fish ate. Then people ate those fishes. As our testing became more sensitive, we came to realize this mercury in the environment threatened our health. This led to a ban on the use of mercury in 2008, with the goal of not using it in the US and limiting its use around the world.

What if I happen across some mercury?

Despite the ban, mercury is still around us. It can be found in an old home science kit, or a thermometer that your mom has used for decades.

If you find mercury in any form while you are cleaning out the basement or a parent’s house, including a trace amount in an old thermometer, there are specific rules for disposal.

Your community likely offers one or more ways to safely dispose of this dangerous element. A quick guide from the EPA is available here: https://www.epa.gov/mercury/storing-transporting-and-disposing-mercury

A search in your phone book or online should reveal a local drop-off site for your hazardous material.

Going Green with Your Dumpster Rental

We are well into the new century and we’ve all heard the phrase “going green.” We have a general idea of what it means. Being  environmentally conscious. Thinking about sustainability. Leaving a place better than we found it.

 

But sometimes when we’re doing a major project at our home, it’s hard to see how “green” fits into the work of construction.

 

Going green no longer means doing the work slowly, or with prohibitively expensive products.

 

Instead, a few simple steps in prep work are all it takes to make sure that you have done the best you can with your rental.

 

Dumpster = Landfill

 

Ultimately, whatever goes in the dumpster goes to the landfill.

 

So this means you have to pay attention at the start of your project in order to have the greenest project possible.

 

Here are some questions to ask yourself about whatever project you have going on:

 

  1. Can this item be sold?

 

Sometimes a classified ad or a garage sale or some other small event (perhaps undertaken with neighbors instead of by yourself) is the right solution.

 

Rather than throwing away a room, you can sell it to people eager to PAY YOU in order that THEY CAN TAKE IT AWAY.

 

It’s really the best of both worlds.

 

  1. Can this item be repurposed?

 

One simple way to reduce landfill waste is by repurposing or reusing existing items.  Are you throwing away a dresser or other furniture? Maybe it would have a second life in the garage or perhaps given to a friend’s child who’s moving away to their own apartment for college for the first time.

 

Usually this sort of donation is so welcome that someone else will come and pick it up.

 

Green and easy!

 

  1. Does this item recycle?

 

Think about what each item is made of. Is there a large amount of metal in it, like with a bedframe? You might be able to sell this for scrap.

 

Not a lot of home furnishings recycle, but the occasional item can be recycled. And it just takes a moment of consideration.

 

  1. Can this item be donated to a good cause?

 

Most cities have charities that help find homes for useful furniture and items. Some even pay people to refurbish, clean, and sell these materials. A donation not only takes your stuff out of the landfill, but it can create work and income for others.

 

These charities, like St. Vincent DePaul, are a phone call away, and can quickly tell you whether they need your items. If they do, they will make arrangements to pick them up for you.

 

  1. Call Big Daddy Dumpster

 

Once you’ve gone through the checklist, look at what’s left. If it’s more than what can fit in your trash can or go out curbside, it’s time to call an inexpensive professional service to haul away your trash to the landfill. Big Daddy Dumpsters has all sorts of sizes and options to fit your project.

 

Going through this mental checklist at the start of each project can save you time, money, and effort. All while preserving landfill space for future use!

Remodeling and Disposing of Your Dining Room

As COVID-19 or normal nest-fluffing activities prompt us to make bigger and more comprehensive changes to our house, the dining room is typically considered as an afterthought.

We set it, we forget it.

Silverware pun aside, the formal dining room often receives little love. We do a lot of daily eating in and around our expanded kitchens, and the idea of having company for dinner is still a rare treat.

But when it is time to re-do the dining room, here is a guide for how to handle each part of the redesign.

The table – many dining room designs and redesigns focus on the table. Appropriately so. The table makes the determination for whether you will eat in the dining room at all. Is it too big? Is it too formal? Is it covered with the bills, or a vexing jigsaw puzzle?

If you dispose of your dining room table and chairs: think of St. Vincent DePaul or some other local agency that employs folks to resell furniture. If it is functional, there is likely another life with another family. If your table was damaged to the point of unusability, only then should it be thrown in your Big Daddy Dumpster.

The china cabinet: was it part of a set with the dining room table? Then it’s got to go to make room for the replacement. If not, try to determine if it can be redone in a way that complements your new look. And what about the curios that are stored inside? Are they heirlooms whose story you know? Keep them, if not …

If you dispose of your china cabinet and contents: Determine if it is functional. If so, donate it. There is simply no sense in throwing away working furniture in a country with a 40% poverty rate. If it’s broken or unusable, BDD!

The carpet: It’s the focal point of the space only in that it must work with the table. But it gets heavy use, especially on the corners where people step on it while traveling from room to room. If the whole room is getting re-done, the most likely casualty in this war is the carpet or rug.

If/when you dispose of your carpet or rug: There really isn’t a second life for carpeting or a rug. It’s time to consider renting a dumpster for your project, it just got big.

Window treatments, art, and wallpaper: Sorry, they’re gone. They served their purpose, but they were unique to that space and time and design. For the most part, they’re difficult to remove in a way that preserves them. And no one can use them again.

When you dispose of your window treatments and wallpaper: Dumpster. MAYBE your art can earn a second life at a furniture reseller, but they will have a say in that. Be willing to make the trip knowing that you will return with the same full trunk you had when you set out.

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