Pick the Right Sized Trash Bag for the Job

There are a mind-boggling number of different garbage bags on shelves today. Between various brands, bag types, applications, material, and sizes, one could be forgiven for simply grabbing a box and running to the next aisle hoping for the best.

There are more than a dozen different sizes of trash receptacles in homes. The most common types have many brands competing for their trash bag business. Here’s a guide to the types of cans you have at home, and which size trash bag fit them the best.

First, you need to know that the bags are measured in gallons, which can cause confusion. It helps if you imagine liquid poured into the bag, outside of the container, filling it completely. In reality, the bags don’t hold that much, and often would not stand up to holding that amount of liquid.

4 gallon trash bag

These small boutique trash cans are the workhouse of the home. Found in nearly every room, some people opt to not put any bags in them at all. However, a small 4-gallon bag will do nicely. It will keep your can clean and leave plenty of room to tie the bag shut before putting it out to the curb in your larger trash bin.

8 gallon trash bag

Commonly referred to as the kitchen trash bag, the 8-10 gallon bag can be found in every home. Big enough to hold food and refuse from a couple of days of cooking, it is also small enough for anyone to carry out to the trash bin – even your youngest helpers. And it fits comfortably under most kitchen sinks.

12-15 gallon trash bag

This work room or garage trash bag is perfect for hearty use. It can hold a lot of trash from several projects, or one big one. Watch out, though. When full, this bag can be a load to carry!

20 gallon trash bags and larger

Designed for heavier outdoor or industrial use, bags are made to fit receptacles of nearly every size. These can hold bags within a bag, and are often used as liners rather than trash bags. That is, they are used to keep the bin clean while other smaller trash bags are placed inside then dumped into garbage trucks or dumpsters.

Remember: bagging your garbage is a good choice for keeping your trash bins clean. Check with your community guidelines about which kinds of garbage bags are acceptable at your waste site.

Photo by Juan Pablo Serrano Arenas

Spring Cleaning Tips to Keep Your Family Safe and Healthy

When spring arrives, we all face an irresistible urge to throw the windows open, turn the music up, and clean out our homes.

This spring, you can do a deeper clean than normal to make sure that you start the season with a safe, healthy, and virus-free home. Follow these tips to get unusual and hard-to-clean locations spotless this spring.

Deep clean behind the refrigerator

One often-neglected spot in every house is behind the refrigerator. The combination of being hard to reach is combined with natural convection that comes from coils heating and cooling, and in many cases fans that circulate air around the appliance.

This means lots of dust. Add that to the grease naturally found where you do your cooking, and you’ve got a sticky dirty mess.

Use a mix of water and an abundant supply of grease cutting cleaner – including dish soap – to get this spot looking like the day you moved in.

Fight mold in your dehumidifier

As the days heat up, homeowners pull the dehumidifier out of storage to help their basements stay cool and to delay air conditioner season. But what happened inside the dehumidifier during the long off-season? Was it put away completely dry, or did mold possibly grow in the coils?

One way to fight mold is to create a solution of equal parts vinegar and water. Spray or wipe that onto the surface of your coils and every place that water goes during regular operation of the dehumidifier. Then wait several hours for it to dry. Now you can start your season off confident that you aren’t spreading mold spores throughout your house.

You can also use an ultraviolet light to fight mold in your dehumidifier.

Wipe down your door knobs

We were all relieved when we learned that COVID did not spread easily on surfaces but was instead spread in the air between people. However, we ended an important practice that was helping keep us safe from lots of germs: wiping door handles.

Every day we touch the handles of our doors – some more than others – at various times. Sometimes our hands are clean. And sometimes they are not.

It’s impossible to know exactly what viruses, germs, or other contaminants get on our door knobs during this time.

The best solution is to periodically wipe them down with warm soapy water or a mild bleach solution.

Spring is a great time to clean parts of your house you have neglected all winter long.

Photo by Arno Smit on Unsplash

Build a Patio This Summer

Summer is coming. And when it arrives, you will be looking for reasons to spend time outdoors. And you will need more space to support your many outdoor activities: cooking, hosting guests and friends, or just reading. The perfect place for all of this activity is your new patio.

Depending on a variety of factors, a wood or a poured concrete patio might be the right choice for you.

Should I choose a concrete patio?

If you need a ground level patio on level ground outside your home, a concrete patio might be the right solution.

Durable, easy to clean, and available in a variety of custom finishes, for many homeowners this is the ideal choice. Custom pours and finishes can make modern concrete look like brick or stone, and even match existing walks and the drive. Custom dyes make concrete a fashionable option.

One downside is that concrete pours tend to be expensive. Additionally, these take more space to build, as access for the truck to pour concrete, or several workers to carry it by the wheelbarrow, makes it a choice for large and flatter spaces.

Should I choose a wood deck?

Pressure treated lumber has long been a favorite building material for porches and decks. Its affordability and flexibility allow for a variety of uses including ground level, upper level, or even multi-level patio / porch visions.

Contractors and avid do-it-yourselfers find wood to be the ideal solution. Since most homeowners already have the necessary tools for woodworking, and lumber is available at a big box store within driving distance of most locations, many homes today have wooden decks.

Some downsides of lumber is that it typically is limited to a variety of wood colors. Additionally, finished wood decks ten to look less formal and are not ideal for every decor or home style.

How do I start?

Make sure you have the space and structure for the patio or deck you desire. In some cases this means taking out an existing deck or patio. Destruction on this level often means renting a dumpster to take away yard debris or the torn down remnants of the original structure that was in that location.

You can work with the friendly staff at Big Daddy Dumpster to arrange a dumpster of the perfect size to match your project and arrange drop-off and pick-up times that match your project calendar.

Photo by Cameron Smith on Unsplash

 

COVID Spring Cleaning Tips

How is it March already? Winter is coming to a close, and we all need a fresh start to the new season. Spring is a time for renewal, longer days, and uplifted moods. There’s no better way to prepare for Spring’s arrival than to do a thorough Spring cleaning.

Spring cleaning might look a bit different this year after yet another winter trapped inside due to COVID. But warmer weather is approaching, and the time to reinvigorate your life is coming. Take the time this spring to really get into every room and get it clean from winter’s gloom.

Here are some helpful tips to get you through to the next season:

Go through your refrigerator and freezer! COVID might’ve had you stocked up on every type of frozen meal in case of another lockdown, but make sure you sort through what food has passed its expiration date. This will leave you more room to stock up on fresh, in season foods. After you’ve sorted your food, wipe down your refrigerator and freezer. A lot more grime can be hiding in the drawers, door, and shelves than you think.

Dust! Dust! Dust! After the long winter, dust particles have had more than enough time to settle onto various surfaces, cushions, walls, curtains, and more. Being able to open your windows this spring will only lead to more dust and pollen finding their way into your home, so get ahead of it and start with a clean slate.

Mop your floors and throw away any worn doormats! Snow boots and winter shoes may have tracked dirt, mud, residue from sidewalk salt, and more across your floors, and spring cleaning is the time to scrub that out of your home. Take your mops and sponges for a final cleaning then discard them and invest in new supplies for the spring.

Sort through your clothes! Clothes are something often overlooked during spring cleaning, but finally deciding to give away that pile of old sweaters you haven’t worn all winter might help you feel that sense of spring renewal. Save some space in your closet and spend some quality time in your closet this year. When you’ve decided what to keep and what to give away, find a local thrift shop or resale store to donate them to!

There are plenty more ways to attack your spring cleaning list, but those are some good starting points after a winter trapped inside.

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

What is That Spill in My Garage?

When it gets to be time to clean out your garage, and you have worked all day to get it cleaned out, you are likely to see something you haven’t seen in a long time: your garage floor.

And there you are likely to find a wide variety of spills and stains.

Here is a handy guide to the kinds of stains you might find, and how you should go about cleaning them up.

Gasoline

A common spill in the garage is gasoline. This kind of spill happens most often if you use a gas powered mower or trimmer.  These often require that you mix gas and oil in a separate container and then fill the mower or trimmer through a spout. Those spouts are prone to leak.

You will likely recognize the smell of gasoline stain. Sop up any excess fluid with a cloth or rag, then dispose of that in the trash after allowing the cloth to sit in a breeze to allow gasoline to evaporate. This will keep it from becoming a fire threat in your trash can. The remaining stain can be treated with kitty litter or sawdust which will help draw the remaining liquid out.

Oil

Another common garage spill is oil. This can happen the same way the gasoline spills happen, because many two-stroke engines require a mix of gasoline and oil, so these spills often happen together. Additionally, it can happen if you change your oil in your garage. It is not unusual for a little oil to get on the floor from a drip, or perhaps even a spill if you accidentally knock something over.

As with gas, you should sop up excess or standing fluid with a cloth, kitty litter, or sawdust. After allowing it to air out until the odor diminishes, you can then sweep it up into a trash bag and throw it away.

Windshield wiper fluid

A third, most common spill in a garage is windshield wiper fluid. This is frequently colorless, but might have a sweet odor, if you’re adventurous enough to have a sniff.

Cleanup is very straightforward, just sop up the excess with a rag or towel. Luckily this poses no threat in your trash.

If you are routinely finding these stains under your car, and you note that the spill returns after you have cleaned it up, the problem isn’t your garage, it’s your car. Take it to your mechanic to make sure that the leak can be fixed and it quits messing up the garage you worked so hard to clean!

Driveway stains. Photo by Jon Moore on Unsplash

 

I Found an Old Chemical Barrel Cleaning Out My New Property, What Do I Do?

You are excited to get out into that  old structure on the back of your new property. There’s lots of junk in there: metal that would have to be scrapped, parts of things that crumbled or broke as you moved them. But you weren’t expecting this.

There under a tarp are a couple of barrels of some sort of liquid. Perhaps you can read the label or perhaps they are covered over with grime and dust from years of neglect. For some reason the previous owner could not dispose of what’s ever inside these barrels, or else they believed it would one day come in handy and kept it safe.

But now it is yours.  and you don’t know what it is.

What should you do?

esist your urge to see

First you have to resist your curious urge to check what is inside. It is natural to want to pry open the lid and have a look at this new mysterious liquid you own. You might be thinking to yourself, “How bad could it be?”

In actuality it could be really bad. After all there is a reason the previous owner did not dispose of it. It is possibly extremely hazardous material. Opening it could pose a hazard to you and others working in that area, and could even make the space uninhabitable.

Worse yet, some sealed materials deteriorate over time, and when you open the barrel, exposing them to oxygen could give them fuel they need to burst into flame.

Call the fire department

If the label on the side of the barrel is clearly labeled and  you can read the numbers,  you should call your local fire department and speak with a firefighter. This firefighter can tell you what exactly is contained in the barrel and what you need to do to safely dispose of it.

If the label on the side of the barrel can’t be read,  firefighters will respond to your location. They will bring the apparatus they need to investigate what’s in that barrel in a way that keeps everyone safe by preventing a fire or sickness from inhaling noxious or dangerous fumes.

It is easy to forget that firefighters strive to prevent problems rather than merely responding to them.  one phone call allows them to do their job and helps to keep you and your property safe.

Let firefighters tell you what is in the barrel. Picture by HafisFox via Pixabay.

 

Disposing of Your Artificial Christmas Tree Responsibly

Your artificial Christmas tree may save you a trip out in the cold winter weather to cut down or purchase a living one, but after years of sweeping away the plastic needles you may be debating on if it’s time to let it go.

Before tossing it to the curb, consider two more eco-friendly avenues of disposing of your artificial Christmas tree:

Donate it!

Local charities may be open to accommodating your used Christmas tree. While finding ways to sustainably dispose of your tree are good options, donating it for reuse and repurposing is the most eco friendly! Charities such as Goodwill and Salvation Army are good options to start with, so long as your tree is in decent shape. You could also try online buyer-seller avenues such as Facebook marketplace.

Recycle/repurpose it!

While correctly recycling your artificial Christmas tree is a viable option, you should not throw it in with your regular weekly or bi-weekly recycling. This is due to a common component of artificial trees: PVC, a material that many recycling plants cannot properly process. If your city has the capability to process a wider variety of plastics, it is worth checking if they are also able to process your tree. Otherwise, err on the side of caution and call your local recycling center.

Your local recycling center may be able to accommodate a special pickup and disposal of your artificial tree for you. Call ahead to make sure this is an option, but it is likely that there is a source for properly recycling your artificial tree in your area. This will ensure proper handling and processing of the plastic. Before doing this, make sure that you have completely taken down all of your decorations, leaving a bare tree. Leaving non-recyclable items or that can’t be accommodated items on your tree can further disrupt the recycling process.

If neither of those options seem to be the right one for you, feel free to look for inspiration on other websites that give options for repurposing your tree and its parts. While the tree as a whole may not be fit for another year of Christmas/holiday celebration, smaller components like the base or individual branches may be able to be crafted into smaller mantelpieces, centerpieces, or door frame decorations.

Before hastily disassembling your artificial tree and throwing it away, there are many sustainable options you should consider before tossing it to the curb!

Dispose of your artificial Christmas tree responsibly.

Photo by Ryutaro Tsukata from Pexels

Cleaning Up After Christmas Might Not Require a Dumpster

You’ve had a big holiday house party with your family, neighbors, friends, and more. Now what? There are holiday decorations in the doorways, on the tables, and all about your living space. There are plates and dishes scattered on your counters, leaving the dining room and kitchen looking cluttered and chaotic. While your first instinct may be to grab a big black trash bag and scoop it all inside, there may be other options before throwing it all away.

First, while the large messes left by the whirlwind of people coming and going may be overwhelming, it’s best to attack one space at a time. Take the time in each room to separate trash from recycling, and pull out what is reusable for the next year. Trying to clean each room at the same time will leave you exhausted and feeling pulled in a hundred different directions. Make a list of things you need to do in each room to help you stay focused; this will also help fight the need to simply dump everything in a trash bag and move on.

Second, once you’ve avoided the urge to throw everything away, recognize what is able to be reused. All plastic dishware should be put in the sink for washing, and most Christmas decorations can be put in a box and in storage for next season. Not only is this a more sustainable route to take while cleaning up, it will also save you the need to go out and buy new supplies for the next year. If you find yourself having to dispose of a lot of your holiday material this year, consider looking for more reusable decor for the future!

Lastly, make sure you have a designated place for each item. Knowing where each decoration or utensil item will go as you begin to clean up will streamline your tidying process and eliminate the need for a trash bag completely! If you are done with certain decorations after a year, have a designated place for donation items. Taking these things to be reused and repurposed will decrease the amount of trash you produce and give your items a new home for the next year.

So, before pulling out your big trash bag determined to get the cleaning done as fast as possible, take the time to limit your waste and stay organized for the holiday seasons to come.

Cleaning up After Christmas doesn’t have to bring out your inner Grinch

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Properly Dispose of Your Real Christmas Tree This January

The Christmas season is winding down, and it’s time for the annual “what do we do with the Christmas tree?” discussion. While you could throw it to the curb to be collected, there are several more sustainable options for you to consider.

The first option is to take it to a composting site. Check with your local composting sites to confirm if they accommodate Christmas trees, and if they do, drive it there to be properly disposed of! Composting centers will know how to most efficiently break down the wood and its parts, rather than a dumpster site that will likely just pile it amongst the other holiday waste produced. Composting will also turn the tree into nutritious soil for other planting endeavors.

Secondly, you could turn it into wood chips for sustainable landscaping. This does require extra equipment, but if you are in need of more mulch for your front yard, look no farther than your tree. The wood chips made from your Christmas tree will also naturally break down in your yard, enriching the soil with the nutrients it contains. If you have a wood chipper available, consider this option as an eco-friendly way to reuse your tree year round.

Another option is to peplant it if it still has the roots. Most Christmas trees are sold pre-cut or in a way that lets you cut it yourself, but in the case that it was sold to you with the roots still attached, there are ways to replant it. Confer with a botanist or plant nursery on the best way to do this, or if there is a place that replants trees.

Lastly, an option you have is to take off the branches and make a wood pile, both as a habitat for animals and insects and for firewood. The dry needles and branches will be quick and easy firewood for your or your neighbors. Creating a pile will also create a small living area for small animals such as chipmunks, and insects and arachnids like beetles and spiders.

All in all, consider alternative options to simply throwing away your real Christmas tree at the end of the holiday season. Though this is only the start of a long list of ways to sustainably dispose of your tree, it is a great starting point as you clean up for the New Year!

 

This is improper Christmas tree disposal

Photo by Simon Berger from Pexels

Cut Through The Dumpster Clutter

Use this handy guide to determine the dumpster you need

1. Examine the work you need to do

Before you even pick up the phone, look closely at the work you need to do. Remind yourself of this important rule: a broken thing generally takes up more space in a trash can or dumpster than it would take up if you simply folded or collapsed it.

2. Clarify what size dumpster you need.

As you envision the amount of debris your project will generate, remember too that the dumpster is not only for demolition. It can be handy for construction too. Where will you place the wrapping for your supplies and leftover or waste materials? Think about how you might rent just one dumpster for the life of your project, and get it all taken away at once.

Review the 10 cubic yard, 15 cubic yard, and 20 cubic yard options at the Big Daddy Dumpsters dumpster sizing page to get a better picture of what you will need.

3. (If applicable) determine how many dumpsters it will take to haul away the whole job

Most home projects can be completed with only one dumpster. Professional contractors working on larger projects, however, will want to consider how much debris and waste their project will throw off in a given period of time. These contractors will want to consider how frequently they will trade a full dumpster for an empty one and work that into their order.

4. Review your project budget and determine haul-away allowances

One line of your budget for a large project should be dedicated to waste disposal. While many people live in a municipality with some waste provisions, many projects generate more than their neighborhood trash company will haul away at once. And no one wants to store their old waste on their property, ruining the visual effect of completing the project!

5. Call Big Daddy Dumpster

 

Once you have taken all of the steps above, you now have the answers you need to have an informed conversation with your Big Daddy Dumpster representative. Call them today with the parameters of your project: dates, dumpster size required, number of dumpsters needed, and then ask any other questions you have.

Our friendly and knowledgeable representatives will be glad to assist you today!

Dumpster Near Me. Determine your dumpster budget, then call Big Daddy Dumpster.

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